June 2018 in retrospect

June 2018 in retrospect

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June has been a sad month: the US government had decided, at least temporarily, to separate children from their families as a punishment for coming into the country outside of official points of entry. Many of the people seeking refuge do not speak English, or Spanish, for that matter. So it's been wonderful to see that the wonderful Esther Navarro-Hall has called her "Interpreter Brigade" into action again. Members of the interpreting community volunteer for, say, Mayan languages or Zapotec.


Also sad: My fellow interpreters at the European Parliament have started a strike action over new working conditions imposed by the administration. The history to this is long and complicated, and you can say and think what you will about what happened so far - the fact that interpreters can not exercise their right to strike is regrettable. Florian Eder mentioned it in his Brussels Playbook newsletter:


In other news, I really enjoyed a long and detailed discussion on Twitter about a controversial comment by Professor Graham Turner about the impending end of interpreter training (tweeted by my friend and podcaster in crime, Jonathan Downie). 


Also in June, I started the second edition of the eCPD webinar on Tablet Interpreting with Joshua Goldsmith. You can still join us (and catch up on the first three sessions). More info here.


Lastly, I really enjoyed listening to this cover of "Maneater":

How (I'm trying) not to lose my mind in the internet age

How (I'm trying) not to lose my mind in the internet age

[Guest Post] The European Youth Event 2018

[Guest Post] The European Youth Event 2018